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Male Pattern Baldness (Androgenic alopecia)

Up to 95 percent of permanent hair loss is due to androgenetic alopecia, a hereditary condition that affects millions of men, women and children. This condition is characterized by what we call pattern baldness.

Male Pattern Baldness generally starts with a receding hairline at the front or thinning of the crown hair and gradually progresses until, in extreme cases, only a thin horseshoe-shaped rim of hair remains at the back and sides of the head.

Female Pattern Baldness

Up to 95 percent of permanent hair loss is due to androgenetic alopecia, a hereditary condition that affects millions of men, women and children. This condition is characterized by what we call pattern baldness.

Female pattern baldness has received more attention in recent years, refers to general thinning of hair all over the scalp, usually beginning at around age 30 and becoming more noticeable after 40 and particularly after menopause.

Alopecia Areata

According to the American Hair Loss Council, alopecia areata also affects (to some degree) millions of men, women and children. This non-scarring, inflammatory condition is usually temporary -- it's experienced in episodes by almost 90 percent of those who have it. Alopecia areata is generally thought to be an autoimmune disease in which cells from an individual's own immune system mistakenly prevent hair follicles from producing hair fiber. In many cases, the body will use its own management system to reverse the problem in time. However, those affected even temporarily by the disease can experience low self-esteem and depression and may need help from their families and friends. The National Alopecia Areata Foundation says that approximately 20 percent of alopecia areata cases are related to heredity, as opposed to androgenic alopecia, in which heredity plays a more prominent role.

Alopecia totalis - An advanced form of alopecia areata that results in total hair loss of the scalp

Alopecia universalis - Another form of advanced alopecia areata that causes hair loss over the entire body.

Traction Alopecia

Hair loss caused by physical stress and tension

Telogen effluvium

Hair loss caused by:

  • Physical stress - Surgery, illness, anemia, rapid weight change
  • Emotional stress - Mental illness, death of a family member
  • Thyroid abnormalities
  • Medications - High doses of vitamin A, blood pressure medications, gout medications
  • Hormonal changes - Pregnancy, birth control pills, menopause

Anagen effluvium

Hair loss caused by chemotherapy